Sustainable Hospitality with GROHE

The savvy hotel guest knows that sustainable hospitality is about much more than reusing your towels. Recent studies by the Carbon Trust show that hotel guests are more inclined to choose an eco-friendly hotel, even if it means paying a premium – but what can hoteliers do to enhance their sustainability credentials?

Bathroom manufacturer GROHE recently started rolling out its Water and Energy Audit, a way for hotels to gage their water and energy consumption and identify areas of improvement. The audit begins in the guest room, where 45% of hotel water use takes place – and dripping faucets and inefficient fittings can produce a large amount of waste. Public areas such as shared bathrooms, spa areas, kitchens and laundries are also assessed to see if GROHE’s economical product range can provide a better solution.

Since it began in Scandinavia, the findings have been astonishing and the response to the program overwhelmingly positive. “At its heart, it’s a way of getting savings for our customers and showing how our products can deliver that – that they’re not just shiny and pretty,” says Christopher Barger, Vice President of Global Projects EMEA & Americas at GROHE.

Christopher Barger, VP Global Projects EMEA & Americas, GROHE

Christopher Barger, VP Global Projects EMEA & Americas, GROHE

Barger reports that hundreds of hotels have jumped on board, with GROHE now pushing out the initiative worldwide.  A 200 room luxury hotel in Copenhagen recently fitted its guest rooms with GROHE’s water-saving EcoJoy products following an audit, and recorded savings of 43 per cent within a very short period.

EcoJoy by GROHE

EcoJoy by GROHE

The EcoJoy range, as with all of the company’s products, is designed by the GROHE design team, led by Paul Flowers. Keeping design in-house, Barger says, “helps us keep our ear close to the ground, staying ahead and reacting quickly to the market changing.” And what the market wants now, are products with an economical focus.

“There’s a key interest in it,” Barger says. “Hotels are thinking about power, what they can save – and the focus is on water and energy. The water and energy audit [delivers] payback in the short term.”

Join Christopher Barger at the Sleep conference on 21 November at 2:00pm as he takes to the stage for Bathrooms Spotlight, a look at best practice and trends in hotel bathroom design. Visit the Sleep website for the full seminar lineup and don’t forget to register for the event to secure your place.  

GROHE
grohe.com

Advertisements

The Ideal Hotel Room according to Punkt.

What makes the perfect hotel experience? For Swiss-based electronics brand Punkt. it’s all about simplicity and service, writes Marcia Caines.  

The hotel is often a sanctuary for the weary traveller, or a special treat for holidaymakers. Whatever the weather when you walk into a hotel room and close the door behind you, it becomes a retreat. And from that moment on it’s the experience that matters.

For every guest the ideal hotel room is different. Your favourite accommodation might be art deco or trimmings and tassles; modern-minimalistic or luxurious; cosy or businessy, or simply a room with a view. Personal choices are made when booking but wherever you choose to lodge you will need to add good service and privacy to make it memorable.

At Punkt. in Switzerland we make long-lasting electronic design classics for simpler living. We will be showcasing our products at Sleep for the first time because we believe that, thanks to their quiet simplicity and timelessness, they complement any styled interior and improve the overall hotel experience. Design at Punkt. is led by the award-winning industrial designer Jasper Morrison, who is internationally renowned for his ability to enhance normality through design.

DP 01 phone, designed by Jasper Morrison for Punkt.

DP 01 phone, designed by Jasper Morrison for Punkt.

Our products – the DP 01 Cordless Phone,  the AC 01 Alarm Clock – can be appreciated in some of Europe’s most popular abodes: the ultra-modern Hotel Alma Barcelona, the quintessentially British Connaught London, the exclusive Chedi Andermatt and the charming riverside hotel The Krafft Basel.

We go back to basics to offer hoteliers the beauty of timeless design and while we believe the ideal hotel room doesn’t exist, we are positive the ideal experience does!

AC 01 alarm clock, designed by Jasper Morrison for Punkt.

AC 01 alarm clock, designed by Jasper Morrison for Punkt.

See the Punkt. product range at Sleep 20-21 November as part of the Newcomers’ Gallery. To register for the event, visit the website – and stay tuned to Between Our Sheets for more of the latest on our speakers and exhibitors.

Like what you see? Contact Lorenzo Sorbi, Sales and Marketing Manager on +41 76 325 94 59 or ls@punktgroup.com for more on Punkt. or come and say hi to him at the show! 

Punkt
punktgroup.com

Assemblyroom at the Newcomers’ Gallery

Hatton arm chair, Hyde stacking stool and Burgess compact table by Assemblyroom

Hatton arm chair, Hyde stacking stool and Burgess compact table by Assemblyroom

The spirit of the 50s and 60s lives on this year at the Sleep Event with our Pop Art-inspired Sleep Hotel brief – so it’s fitting that this year we’re also welcoming Assemblyroom to the Sleep lineup for the first time as part of the Newcomers’ Gallery.

The furniture line, launched three years ago by interior and product designers Peter and Cathy Wall as an extension of their commercial interior design practice, has garnered much attention in a short time. Bold shapes and bright colours characterise the retro-inspired collection. Peter and Cathy’s background in commercial interiors shines through in their products. Each piece is simple but eye-catching, creating maximum visual impact with the cleanest of lines – making their designs perfect for hotel breakout areas, contemporary hospitality interiors and workplaces.

Hyde stacking stool by Assemblyroom

Hyde stacking stool by Assemblyroom

Burgess compact table by Assemblyroom

Burgess compact table by Assemblyroom

The mid century-influenced Finsbury sofa already looks set to become somewhat of an icon, having been specified in numerous hospitality and commercial projects in the UK and internationally.

Finsbury 2 seater sofa by Assemblyroom (also available as 3 seater and armchair)

Finsbury 2 seater sofa by Assemblyroom (also available as 3 seater and armchair)

See the Finsbury sofa, Hatton arm chair, Hyde stacking stool and Burgess compact table by Assemblyroom at the Sleep Event as part of the Newcomers Gallery, new to Sleep in 2013.

Digital Dangers

Patrick Goff

Written by Patrick Goff, editor of Hoteldesigns.net

Increasing digitisation of the means of production offers opportunities that were not available fifteen years ago. Going ‘bespoke’ is now possible in smaller quantities than ever, enabling designers to realise their personal vision like never before. Luxury for designers is digital control.

In earlier times designers had to choose from a range of available products to realise their vision, but as minimum quantities for bespoke continue to decline and individual impact pieces such as digital wall paper panels become more affordably available, now they can begin to affordably produce the FF&E items to match their imagination.

Technical development will continue to accelerate this process; Brintons for example can now weave over 32 colours in axminster, and will soon take this to 64 colours, and order amounts are smaller than the old requirement of a full roll.

With this ability to produce unique designs comes higher risk for the designer, as with increase in control comes increase in responsibility. The taste judgements made will be subject to higher scrutiny, a self critical awareness will be needed, more harmony, control and quality of aesthetic than perhaps many designers are equipped to deliver.

Design has always demanded intellectual rigour, but has been moderated by the restricted product ranges available. As product choice continues the exponential expansion of the last 20 years so the rigour becomes more demanding. Knowing historical sources, having a strong understanding of planning, form and colour whilst being aware of the need to respect others’ copyright will be key for innovative interiors. But above all the designer will know the difference between being an intellectual and creative leader of designer trends and being a self-indulgent decorator.

hoteldesigns.net

Up in the Trees

The Cabin, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

The Cabin, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

Kent and Britta Lindvall

Kent and Britta Lindvall

Ever fancied escaping from the hustle and bustle of modern life to your very own treehouse? At Sweden’s Treehotel, visitors experience an entirely new environment and perspective. We speak to co-founder Kent Lindvall.

Treehouses have connotations of childhood, of carefree days spent playing, climbing and finding a retreat amongst the branches – which may be why a series of Scandinavian treetop retreats are drawing eager visitors from around the world.

Kent Lindvall and his wife Britta launched the Treehotel concept in Harads, northern Sweden in 2010. After nine years running a guesthouse in the stunning surroundings and tranquillity of Swedish Lapland, they decided to expand their business and offer their visitors something a little different. When a documentary crew arrived in the nearby area to create ‘The Tree Lover’, a film about three men building an isolated treehouse home, Kent and Britta were inspired to adapt this idea of ‘getting back to your roots’ into a new hotel concept.

“We found that people realised, high up in the trees with a good view, [the experience] reminded them of their childhood,” Kent explains.

Mirrorcube interior. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

Mirrorcube interior. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

The Birds Nest, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

The Birds Nest, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

Three years later, Treehotel now numbers five treerooms, a tree sauna accommodating up to twelve people and a multi-use space which can function as a conference room or group accommodation. Created by different local architects and construction companies, each structure has its own aesthetic and ambience. There’s the Mirrorcube, which disappears into its surroundings thanks to its reflective surfaces; the Bird’s Nest, with its deceptively detailed facade giving way to a smooth, simple interior; and the UFO, designed to look as if it has been transplanted from a different world. What the rooms have in common are their amazing views of the surrounding forest and Lule River, as well as their eco credentials: materials and construction techniques were carefully chosen to disrupt the natural environment as little as possible; all rooms are expertly insulated, rely on green hydroelectric power and are water-efficient.

The Blue Cone, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

The Blue Cone, Treehotel. Photo: Peter Lundstrom, WDO

The concept has proven massively popular with visitors eager to experience something new and see a different side of Sweden. “75% of our guests are from other countries around the world; half of them have never been to Sweden before,” Kent says. “The hotel is an attraction in itself. [Guests] look for the quiet. I think the reason to come is to have a quiet holiday close to nature, but also to experience the design and a new experience in a tree house.” The allure for the high-end private jet crowd is also strong. “They have tried everything else in the world,” Kent says. “Here, they can see the Northern Lights in winter; it’s close to the Arctic Circle. Winter is a spectacular time to come here.”

The Mirrorcube, Treehotel. Photo: Fredrik Broman, Human Spectra

The Mirrorcube, Treehotel. Photo: Fredrik Broman, Human Spectra

Kent and Britta hope to develop the Treehotel concept further in the next few years, though the plan is to maintain the project’s boutique, exclusive feel. The idea may travel to other countries if the right opportunities and locations can be found, with Scotland one of the planned locations.

Join Kent Lindvall at the Sleep Conference on Thursday 21 November at 11:45 as he takes to the stage for ‘To contemplate or not – fad or the future?’. This session requires booking, and reservations are upon until Friday 18 October. Visit the website to register your interest.